Return to Headlines

Fighting the flu

Revised Tuesday, February 12, 2019

It's important to be aware of the symptoms of the flu virus, how it spreads and what can be done to protect your child.

Flu Poster

At Berkeley County School District, we ask that you not come to school/work if you are sick. If you have flu like symptoms, consult your doctor immediately. Proper and frequent hand washing along with coughing and sneezing etiquette are important.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that since 2010 as many as 26,000 children younger than five years of age have been hospitlized each year due to influenza (flu).  ** Tips and information shared below were provided by the CDC and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). **

HOW SERIOUS IS THE FLU?

The virus can vary from mild to severe. Children with long-term health problems are at high risk for complications like pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus and ear infections. Some health problems that are known to make children more vulnerable include asthma, diabetes and disorders of the brain/nervous system.

HOW DOES FLU SPREAD?

Flu viruses are thought to spread mainly by droplets made when someone with flu coughs, sneezes or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby. A person also can get the flu by touching something that has flu virus on it and then touching their mouth, eyes or nose.

WHAT ARE FLU SYMPTOMS?

Flu symptoms can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny/stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills, feeling tired and sometimes vomiting and diarrhea (more commong in children than adults). Some people with the flu will never have a fever.

HOW CAN I PROTECT MY CHILD?

- A flu vaccination is recommended for everyone six months and older, every year.

- It's especially important that young children and children with certain long-term health problems get vaccinated.

- Caregivers of children at high risk of flu complications should get a vaccine. (Babies younger than six months are at high risk for serious flu complications, but too young to get a flu vaccine.)

- Pregnant women should get a flu vaccine to protect themselves and their baby from flu. Reshearch shows that flu vaccination protects the baby from flu for several months after birth.

- Flu viruses are constantly changing and so flu vaccines are updated often to protect against the flu viruses that research indicates are most likely to cause illness during the upcoming flu season. 

- Stay away from people who are sick as much as possible. (view School and Childcare Exclusion List)

- Remember to regularly cover your coughs and sneezes.

- Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth and clean surfaces that may be contaminated with flu viruses.

FOR MORE INFORMATION - visit cdc.gov/flu

At Berkeley County School District, we ask that you not come to school/work if you are sick. If you have flu like symptoms, consult your doctor immediately. Proper and frequent hand washing along with coughing and sneezing etiquette are important.